Good morning.  I remember two things about Good Friday, as a kid, growing up.  The first, it always seemed to rain on Good Friday and the sky always seemed so dark and dreary and overcast, sort of like creation testifying to the truthfulness of this day; and the second thing I remember is wondering why we call Good Friday “good,” when it is such a dark and brutal day in the life of our Lord?

For Christians, Good Friday is a crucial day of the year because it celebrates what we believe to be the most momentous day in the history of the world. On Good Friday we remember the day Jesus willingly suffered and died by crucifixion as the ultimate sacrifice for our sins (1 John 1:10). Still, why call the day of Jesus’ death “Good Friday” instead of “Bad Friday” or something similar? Some Christian traditions do take this approach: in German, for example, the day is called Karfreitag, or “Sorrowful Friday.” In English, in fact, the origin of the term “Good” is debated: some believe it developed from an older name, “God’s Friday.” Regardless of the origin, the name Good Friday is entirely appropriate because the suffering and death of Jesus, as terrible as it was, marked the dramatic culmination of God’s plan to save his people from their sins.

In order for the good news of the gospel to have meaning for us, we first have to understand the bad news of our condition as sinful people under condemnation. The good news of deliverance only makes sense once we see how we are enslaved. Another way of saying this is that it is important to understand and distinguish between law and gospel in Scripture. We need the law first to show us how hopeless our condition is; then the gospel of Jesus’ grace comes and brings us relief and salvation.

In the same way, Good Friday is “good” because as terrible as that day was, it had to happen for us to receive the joy of Easter. The wrath of God against sin had to be poured out on Jesus, the perfect sacrificial substitute, in order for forgiveness and salvation to be poured out to the nations. Without that awful day of suffering, sorrow, and shed blood at the cross, God could not be both “just and the justifier” of those who trust in Jesus (Romans 3:26). Paradoxically, the day that seemed to be the greatest triumph of evil was actually the deathblow in God’s gloriously good plan to redeem the world from bondage.

The cross is where we see the convergence of great suffering and God’s forgiveness. Psalm 85:10 sings of a day when “righteousness and peace” will “kiss each other.” The cross of Jesus is where that occurred, where God’s demands, his righteousness, coincided with his mercy. We receive divine forgiveness, mercy, and peace because Jesus willingly took our divine punishment, the result of God’s righteousness against sin. “For the joy set before him” (Hebrews 12:2) Jesus endured the cross on Good Friday, knowing it led to his resurrection, our salvation, and the beginning of God’s reign of righteousness and peace.

Good Friday marks the day when wrath and mercy met at the cross. That’s why Good Friday is so dark and yet so Good.  Amen.

Blessings,
Pastor Bryan E. Drebes

Throughout the Coronavirus Pandemic, I will be sharing some daily devotional thoughts.  Hopefully, this will be daily (M-F), but there may be some days when I am unable to provide a written devotion due to other pressing ministry needs. Please know you can always tune into 850 AM for KFUO programs and worship services.  You can go to www.LHM.org for devotions and the Lutheran Hour program.  You can go to www.IssuesEtc.org for LCMS programs and blog posts.  You can even access www.CPH.org for their numerous resources. Just please do whatever you can to stay in the Word.  I would remind you to like our Facebook page.  By doing this you will see current posts and be reminded of upcoming sermons and services.  Finally make sure you stop by our website www.pacifichillslutheran.org where you will find a wealth of information including past sermons. 

 

Pastor Drebes is Pastor at Pacific Hills Lutheran Church Rev. Bryan Drebes is Pastor at Pacific Hills Lutheran Church in Omaha Nebraska

Pastor Drebes attended Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, Missouri, beginning in 1997.  He spent the summer of 1999 teaching English to Chinese middle school teachers in Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China.  He served a four-month vicarage at St. John Lutheran Church, Plymouth, Wisconsin, followed by eight months at Bethany Lutheran Church, Overland Park, Kansas. Pastor Drebes was ordained into the Office of the Holy Ministry at Zion Lutheran Church, Palmyra, Missouri on August 19, 2001, and installed as Associate Pastor of Bethany Lutheran Church, Overland Park, Kansas on September 9, 2001.  He served Bethany for 14 years.  Pastor Drebes accepted a Divine